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Clarrie Charter January 8, 2018

Under a cloudless sky and with barely a breath of wind we ventured out onto the mirrored lake. It was hot and still but Feizul and Shane managed to rustle up a few fish. I was surprised to see an Eel Tailed Catfish Tandanus tandanus take a spinnerbait today. Only the second one I have seen at Clarrie Hall to take a lure. The boys also landed a couple of Australian Bass Macquaria novemaculeata. A little different to the Small and Large Mouth Bass they are used to catching back home, but no doubt 2 welcome editions to their new species lists. Thanks for a great day!

Kayak Fishing Charter, January 2, 2018

Despite our early start, our surface lures were not enticing enough to elicit a strike this morning. However we did notice that there were plenty of fish sounding up in certain areas of the dam. It was just a matter of cycling through a variety of baits and presentations to see what would work. Today the bass responded to both hard bodies and soft plastics. Tony did a fantastic job and managed to net 6 nice bass all between 38-42cm.  Great stuff!

Bass Fishing Charter, December 22, 2017

An early start saw Conrad and I loading up the kayaks with tackle and disappear onto the lake covered in mist. As usual the bass were feeding early under the cover of the low light conditions. It wasn’t long before Conrad opened his account when a small bass snaffled his shallow running minnow. His very next cast connected with a much bigger specimen. It never ceases to amaze me how hard these fish fight for their size, and the protest this fish put up was no exception to the rule. Once netted the bass measured 42cm to the fork, which is about as big as they grow in this waterway.

Conrad managed to land another bass for the morning before the sun burnt through the mist and penetrated the cool clear water. With no cloud and no wind, conditions were hot and the water was glassy calm. Ideal conditions would include cloud cover and some wind, which tends to bring the fish out from under the security of the lily pads and into the open where they feed in the current. Today, the still conditions provided some truly awe inspiring scenery, but the fish went off the bite. None the less, it was another great morning out on Clarrie Hall.

Clarrie is Looking Good!

The water at Clarrie Hall has now cleared and the dam is now looking fantastic. Much of the cabomba weed is gone which makes the fishing much easier. You can now work your lures right along the edges of the lilies without fear of having the lure covered in weed.  The bass could be heard feeding on the surface which makes surface luring around the pads a great option. Today I caught bass hopping a mumbler across the bottom and also found bass by retrieving lipless crankbaits. It is great to see Clarrie firing once again!

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The Pink Thing Fly

The pink thing is probably the most famous and successful barramundi fly. But it is also very effective on a host of other species such as pelagics and even Australian bass. For the most part this fly is tied in the original way its inventor Graham White first tied it, with the exception of the Fish Mask head and weedless wire. Graham recognized that by building a thick body of buck tail and a thick pink ‘webby’ collar, the fly will ‘push water.’ This means that fish can better locate the fly in discolored water. Grahams’ pink thing was tied with bead chain eyes but tying with modern materials such as the Fish Mask will surely add more ‘push’ than ever. The wire weed guard means it can be fished right in among the mangrove roots.

Simon Fitzpatrick

Tweed River Charter, October 17, 2017

Patrick and I arrived at the river at 6am just in time to see the first rays of sunlight hit a very coffee coloured looking Tweed River. As is often the case, after a period of 12 weeks without rain the heavens opened up just a few days prior to the trip. The much needed rain had certainly stirred things up and visibility must have been 6 inches at best. Undeterred Patrick worked his fly at all likely looking snags and eventually found a hungry bass that took a liking to his Donny Brasco fly.

Judging by the colour of the water and the amount of rain we received it may take another couple of weeks before things clear up.

Simon

Gone Fishing Day 2017

This year I spent Gone Fishing Day with OzFish Tenterfield who organized a ripper of a day with a tonne of activities. Here is a quick clip I made showing the highlights of the day.

Tweed River Fishing Charter, October 9, 2017

Andrew and I enjoyed a great days fishing the Tweed River for bass. Andrew had never caught a bass before and it wasn’t long before he nailed his first on a cicada surface lure. His second fell for the same trap soon after. As the sun rose we switched to deeper divers and the bass continued to bite. Another 4 or 5 fish were netted before the sun made an appearance from behind the clouds and the bite slowed down. Andrew still managed another couple of bass before we called it a day. Andrew finished the morning with about 8 nice bass and a smile from ear to ear. Thanks for a great day!

 

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Tweed River Charter. Sept 28, 2017

What a great session we had this morning with Ben and Evo landing 3 fat bass each on surface lures and diving minnows. Well done boys!

Tying The Dahlberg Diver Fly

Dahlberg Diver

The Dahlberg Diver would have to be my all time favorite fly. Anything that swims and feeds off the surface of the water will be tempted by the Dahlberg. Murray cod, bass, golden perch, saratoga, barrumundi, even turtles and water dragons love this fly.

There are a number of pattern variations of this fly and so it can be tied to imitate a frog, insect, lizard, fish or even a mouse struggling on the water. Retrieving with short sharp strips causes the fly to bloop, leaving a bubble trail in it’s wake. Another retrieve that works well with bass is to just leave the fly sit in one place. Every now and then a little shake of the rod tip causes the fly to vibrate like a cicada caught in the surface tension of the water.

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The Dahlberg also has a very good hook up rate. When fish strike surface flies tied with foam, the fly will often bounce away from the fish and fails to hook up. The Dahlberg is made of deer hair which tends to stick to the water and is less buoyant than foam. I believe this helps ensure the fly enters the fishes mouth.

Simon Fitzpatrick